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Unknown Archaeology: Nindowari

A lesser-known Calcolithic civilization in Pakistan


Nindowari, also known as Nindo Damb, is an archaeological site from the Kulli civilisation.


Dating back to 2500 - 2000 BCE, the Kulli region fell under the regions identified as Arachosia and Gedrosia.


Arachosia is the Hellenized name of the ancient easternmost province of the Achaemenid empire. It was centred around the valley of the Arghandab River (modern-day southern Afghanistan) and extended to the Indus River (present-day Pakistan). Gedrosia refers to the region running south of Arachosia, province, west of the Indus River, making up most of what is now Pakistan's Balochistan province.


Unearthed in modern-day Ornach Valley in sub-district (Tehsil) Wadh, Kalat district of Balochistan, Pakistan, the chalcolithic site was located on the banks of the Kud River.


The pottery and other artefacts excavated at the site exhibit considerable Harappan influence.


It is precisely the reason for academic debate around if the Kulli were a sub-culture of the Indus Valley Civilisation or a civilisation of their own amongst pre-historic scholars and academics.


The Kulli culture is both fascinating and partially still a mystery because it pre-dates the Indus Valley Civilisation but also continued to exist simultaneously.


Clay figurines of zebu bulls, a species of cattle native to South Asia, have been found at various Kulli sites, including Nindowari. Many of these were painted, and some were found with carts attached, implying the presence of agriculture in the settlement.


As for women's figurines found, they show elaborate hairstyles and an array of personal ornaments, such as necklaces and bangles.


The culture also exhibits similarities with many other cultures, e.g. this plate exhibits Nal culture influences.



Seals and sealings excavated have also been interpreted to be evidence of the culture's communication with the Iranian plateau, as far as the Jiroft culture, in modern-day Iran.

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